Talking Architecture & Design Podcast (Episode: 55) - In this episode of Talking Architecture & Design, architect and lecturer Tone Wheeler looks at where we went wrong ... Listen Now
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    Coloured Collars
    Coloured Collars

    You may have noticed that the MSM press has recently taken to describing sectors of society by the colour of collars. We investigated and were surprised at the variety of colours now on offer, but disappointed to find that there was not one singled out for designers or architects.


    The Aussie Ute
    The Aussie Ute

    The ‘ute’ is an all-Australian invention. The word that is, not the vehicle design. Testament to our infinite ability to shorten words (utility), our infuriating habit of copying things (US pick-ups) and an infantile obsession with bad DIY (the ute muster).


    Architecture: the fine line between inspired and copied
    Architecture: the fine line between inspired and copied

    When it comes to architecture, imitation could be the sincerest – and most sensible – form of flattery.


    The Winged Keel
    The Winged Keel

    Design is a team sport, and no sport relies on teamwork more than yachting, especially the America's cup.


    Pandemic proofing city buildings: using natural ventilation to reduce the spread of airborne viruses
    Pandemic proofing city buildings: using natural ventilation to reduce the spread of airborne viruses

    The architecture profession is questioning how COVID-19 will shape future cities and their buildings.


    HCV Precast Panels
    HCV Precast Panels

    The recent controversy over the lockdown in apartment towers in Flemington and North Melbourne caused many to ask: “What are those awful buildings?”, not least Annabelle Quince who produces the excellent Rear Vision program ABC RN, found here. The answer has a similar arc to last week's episode about Daceyville: a triumph of design, a failure of society.


    Why technology needs to be brought into the workplace design conversation earlier
    Why technology needs to be brought into the workplace design conversation earlier

    Workplace design in Australia evolves to reflect our changing attitudes towards work. Back in the 1980s, managers and senior executives would have their own segregated four-walled offices while the remainder of the workforce sat in high-walled cubicles. Work was largely carried out in silos and the workforce was still far more male dominated.


    Daceyville
    Daceyville

    There's strong suggestions that social housing should be the leading stimulus for construction after COVID-19, that the government invest in housing for those in housing stress and the homeless. That’s called public housing, but the public has lost all faith in the government to deliver anything for the public, so we call it social housing now.


    Smart cities moving into the 5G network
    Smart cities moving into the 5G network

    With the 5G network getting closer, it's time to look at the benefits of integrating the technology into smart city infrastructure.


    The Integra Chair
    The Integra Chair

    Everyone in Australia has sat on one at some stage. At school, the hospital, the CWA meeting, the work shed, the scout hall, even the officials and timekeepers at the Sydney 2000 Olympics swimming pool. It's the Integra chair by Sebel, a furniture manufacturer still in business, having made countless of these chairs in 46 years.


    How COVID-19 will change landscaping design
    How COVID-19 will change landscaping design

    Our world is changing in unexpected ways as we come to grips with global pandemic and begin to imagine life beyond it. One of those changes is in our revaluing of nature—stuck indoors for weeks on end has increased our appreciation and desire for outdoor spaces that are both safe and reinvigorating.


    Adaptive design – How homes and construction will change following COVID-19
    Adaptive design – How homes and construction will change following COVID-19

    The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked major changes in our world and has resulted in a rethink of our current way of life. We are already seeing a number of significant changes in how people live, work and socialise.


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