Reinvigorating this National Trust registered property, the designers bring it into the 21st century while also meeting stringent heritage requirements and maintaining its strong sense of history.

IN BRIEF

Renovate the existing residence to add new conservatory and living spaces as well as a new garage.

ARCHITECT’S WORDS

The project is in essence a re-organisation of the existing site through a series of new built elements. Through the insertion of a conservatory, garage, podiums and landscape walls a considered re-interpretation shifts the way the existing built and cultivated fabric is experienced. A rigorous understanding of the material, scale, proportion and details of the existing structure allows for a sympathetic architectural language to be generated. Taking cues from the existing context the inserted elements are a series of measured formal (built) and informal gestures (landscape). The formal address of the 1835 residence to the ordered garden is echoed throughout the pavilion.

The new wall located to the rear of the conservatory references the highly detailed, finely struck sandstone fa├žade of the existing. The striation of the sandstone flows toward the view of the garden and mountain in the distance. The paired columns, fascia detail and proportions of the existing veranda have been directly referenced and reinterpreted in the new pavilion. The bluestone and rubble side of the existing building addresses a more informal landscape. The wall has been extended at the rear of the site to form a barrier, providing separation between the old and the new works. An effective close working relationship was formed with the Tasmanian Heritage Council for the duration of the project. The significance of the gardens and the landscaping was discussed throughout, informing the design process.

The addition of the conservatory provided the opportunity to establish a new connection to the garden which was previously denied. Stepping down into the landscape the addition allows the garden to be enjoyed from the comfort of the interior, along with from a series of new external spaces.

The conservatory employed a number of passive solar principles: considered orientation, eaves providing sun shading, double glazing, cross ventilation, and thermal mass. A new garage sits at the rear of the property. The form is derived from the existing cottage, with its steeply hipped front and skillion roof to the rear. The steep pitch of the garage created the opportunity for a loft space, living space and ensuite. This additional space caters for visits from extended family.

ACCOLADES

  • AIA Tasmanian Awards, Residential Architecture Alterations and Additions Award 2011
  • AIA Tasmanian Awards, The Roy Sharrington Smith Award for Heritage Architecture 2011
  • Houses Awards, House Alteration and Additions over 200sqm Category (high commendation) 2011

PRODUCTS

EXTERNAL ELEMENTS
SAWN BLUESTONE LIMESTONE 
BLUESCOPE LYSAGHT, KLIP-LOK

WALLS
GOSFORD QUARRIES, SANDSTONE
TASMANIAN OAK
PLASTERBOARD

WINDOWS
DOUBLE-GLAZED ALUMINIUM-FRAMED

DOORS
DESIGNER DOORWARE CUSTOM
TASMANIAN OAK

LIGHTING
GEORGE NELSON SUACER PENDANT

KITCHEN FRIDGE
LIEBHERR AUSTRALIA

DISHWASHER
SIEMENS HOME APPLIANCES

OVEN
LACANCHE

RANGEHOOD
QASAIR

BATHROOM BASINS
DURAVIT

TOILET
KALDEWEI

BATH
CONODUO

TILES
GASPARRE TILES